From our farms to your table, all food has a story.

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All meat and milk is inspected for traces of antibiotics

Checks and balances in the system keep antibiotics out of the food supply

Assurance your food is antibiotic-free:

  • Food Safety Inspection Service tests on all milk and meat products
  • Food is tested multiple times at several check points from the farm to grocery store
  • Farmers follow strict withdrawal times so medicine is out of the animal’s system before marketing meat or milk 

Farmers use antibiotics to keep animals healthy:

  • Treat sick animals individually with antibiotics
  • Some classes of antibiotics help keep whole herds healthy
  • It’s humane and the right thing to do

Perspectives

Becky Martinez

Becky Martinez

Glen Ellyn, IL

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About Me

I'm a busy mom of twins. Our family, along with our two dogs, loves spending time outdoors and being active. I love learning and experiencing new things!

Why I'm touring farms

I want to see where my food comes from and share what I learn with others. With all the conflicting information about what foods to feed your family, I am looking forward to learning firsthand from the people who grow it.

From a Mom

(On the hog farm tour I learned) That NO DRUGS can be in their systems when sent to harvest. And the incredible amount of tracking and paperwork that is done to be accountable for this. Also that keeping them inside helps prevent the need for antibiotics in the first place!

And while it may seem unnatural or unfair to keep them inside-it's actually BETTER FOR THEM INSIDE. When pigs live outside-they are exposed to the elements, which can alter how they eat and drink. Cold, shivering pigs, need more food. Hot pigs roll around in the mud, that they and their buddies also poop in, along with birds and rodents, which exposes them to diseases, which then have to be treated. Yuck! Indoors, everything is controlled for optimum piggy comfort-from temperature, food and water, ventilation, and best of all-their poop falls through slats in the floor.

Carrie Pollard

Carrie Pollard

Rockford, IL

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From a Farmer

When an animal is sick, it is my responsibility to care for it. Sometimes, the best way for me to do this is to use an antibiotic. However, that animal product (be it milk, meat or eggs) is removed or withheld from the food supply until that antibiotic has cleared the animal's body. All milk is tested for antibiotics on the farm and at the processing plant. Any milk that tests positive for antibiotics cannot be sold to the public and is discarded. I won't give anything to my animals that I do not feel is safe for them, my family, and yours.

Christa Grabske

Christa Grabske

Mount Prospect, IL

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About Me

I lived in a rural Illinois town for 11 years while teaching there. My class enjoyed learning experiences offered by the DeKalb County Farm Bureau. Now, I’m a preschool teacher in the Chicago suburbs where I live with my husband and two children.

Why I'm touring farms

My farm experiences are limited to hayrides at pumpkin farms. I’d like to spend time on an Illinois farm to find out if family farms still exist and see how important they are to our society. As a mom, I want to know what’s in our meat and dairy products.

From a Mom

When I talked to Sand Gould at her farm, antibiotics are only used when an animal is sick, not as a preventive measure. Talking with actual livestock farmers about the use of antibiotics has eased my mind about their use on farms.

I did not realize that a vet comes to the farm on a regular basis, to make sure that the animals are safe and healthy.

Christa Grabske

Christa Grabske

Mount Prospect, IL

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About Me

I lived in a rural Illinois town for 11 years while teaching there. My class enjoyed learning experiences offered by the DeKalb County Farm Bureau. Now, I’m a preschool teacher in the Chicago suburbs where I live with my husband and two children.

Why I'm touring farms

My farm experiences are limited to hayrides at pumpkin farms. I’d like to spend time on an Illinois farm to find out if family farms still exist and see how important they are to our society. As a mom, I want to know what’s in our meat and dairy products.

From a Mom

I was so relieved to find out that our meats do not contain antibiotics, ever! Chicken and pork have no added hormones, and beef has a very small amount-much smaller than the naturally occurring hormones in the plants we eat!

Jill Thurmond

Jill Thurmond

Deer Park, IL

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About Me

I’m a wife and mother of two boys. I love to cook, bake and read, while my boys love to play sports and eat my creations (especially when baked goods are involved)!

Why I'm touring farms

Aside from what I grow in my own garden every summer, I’m not all that knowledgeable about how food is grown. I’m looking forward to becoming more educated in food production and sharing that knowledge with family and friends. I’m also excited to meet other moms in my community!

From a Mom

We do not need to worry about antibiotic use in beef. If antibiotics are used, there are time periods to wait until a cow is sent from the farm to be slaughtered AND the animals are tested before being packaged and sent to stores.

Mike & Lynn Martz Family

Mike & Lynn Martz Family

Maple Park, IL

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About our family

We have a son, Justin, our daughter-in-law, Jamie, our grandson, Jaxson and our granddaughter Jaedyn.

About our food

We grow corn, soybeans and wheat on 6,350 acres. We can also raise 3,500 beef cattle at a time on our feedlot.

About our farm

We’ve been farming since 1979, when we formed the Larson Farms Partnership with Lynn’s father, Ray, and her brothers, Dave and Norm.

We spent the first nine years managing the cattle backgrounding operation in Wisconsin. (Backgrounding means raising the calves on pasture and getting them ready for the feedlot.)  

In 1988, we moved to the main farm in Maple Park. Mike worked with Lynn’s father, Ray, managing the feedlot (where we use high-energy rations to “finish” the cattle, which means getting them ready for market). Lynn handled the billing for our custom feedlot.

 

In 1996, Lynn’s brothers, Norm and Dave, had the opportunity to work with Case IH to develop a crop scouting business (a service to farmers where professionals monitor and evaluate crop health and growth). So at that time, Lynn started to manage the cropping side of the farm.  And our sister-in-law Barb (Norm’s wife) took over the cattle billing as the crop acres began to grow in size. 

Our son Justin joined the Larson Farms Partnership in 2011.

Mike & Lynn on...

Our farming philosophy

To provide safe, nutritious, wholesome beef products to consumers with humane treatment of each animal and production practices that are environmentally friendly.

The best thing about being a farmer

Seeing the fruits of our labor. Though the weather and markets can be challenging, it’s very rewarding to see our accomplishments.

From a Farmer

Mike Martz - We walk those cattle every day; we've got to look at symptoms. When antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, we follow the proper withdrawal time. I don't want to eat meat that has drugs in it. It's not safe for my family or your family. Antibiotic residues are tested for at the packing plant. If that happened they would find the animal and USDA and FDA would track it back to my farm. We're not going to supply animals that have any drug residues.

Pilar Clark

Pilar Clark

Lisle, IL

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About me

I'm a long-time writer and social media strategist and work-at-home mom who understands the need for balance and the difficulty of achieving it in everyday life. Seeing my children thrive and grow is like basking in sunshine.

About my family

We're a relatively traditional suburban clan, made up of two parents and two children, a 5-year old and a 2-year old. Our family likes to spend time at the local zoos and museums and the beach during the summer, and we look forward to taking our children abroad when they're older to explore their multicultural roots.

Why I'm touring farms

I often wonder who cultivates and raises the foods found in our fridge. What kind of farms does our food come from? What kinds of fertilizers, pest control and hormones are used? Who are the people involved and what are their own family food traditions? Knowing how things go from farm to fridge and hearing from the folks who are deeply vested in their farming traditions would be amazing.

How I was inspired about food

I remember eating together as a family, and loved seeing my mom and granny making dinner even though both also worked. It inspired me to start experimenting in the kitchen at a young age with the knowledge that a love of cooking and career could go hand in hand.

From a Mom

Farmers and veterinarians are working to reduce antibiotic use in cattle by focusing on good nutrition and the use of vaccines in comprehensive preconditioning programs before they get big enough for us to eat.

Veronica Ortega

Veronica Ortega

Berwyn, IL

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About Me

We are a family of four – my husband, two sons and me. We like to experience and try new things. I love to cook and my kids love to help. I’m always eager to learn new things and I love to share my experiences as well as acquire new ideas and concepts from others.

Why I'm touring farms

I’m excited to see the farms and their daily processes. I want to learn more about pesticides and other products used to help grow food, and what their effect is on the environment and consumers.

From a Mom

If a cow is sick, they will treat it with antibiotics and farmers ensure the milk from the sick cow does not make it to the consumer's products.

What's your perspective?

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